1. All of Leslie’s compliments to Ann

     
  2. wanted to listen to ‘hooked on a feeling’ but an ad played for the fifty shades of grey movie that i thought got cancelled but instead is coming out valentine’s day 2015 oh god why

     
  3. (Source: noslowsongs)

     
  4. 17:12

    Notes: 13129

    Reblogged from bewbin

    (Source: hentai1080p)

     
  5. 17:11

    Notes: 44666

    Reblogged from geothebio

    Tags: what

    thorkizilla:

    This is it.  This is the pinnacle of nerdom.  This is the greatest height of nerdery that has ever been reached before.

    Peter in Loki’s body on a bus downtown to the real Loki and making an excuse that he’s going to a comic convention.

    Never will such levels of pure fucking nerd ever be seen again, it’s just not possible.  This is a beautiful day, I am glad I am alive to experience this, god bless.

     
  6. 15:39

    Notes: 16908

    Reblogged from thefrogman

    Tags: behind the gif

    noobtheloser:

    "Just keep walking. If I really commit, he’ll just assume I meant to do this."

    I honestly just did this so I could draw the bird looking back like that in the last panel. Hahaha look at him.

    I do a lot of these.

    So do other people.

     
  7. 14:32

    Notes: 2407

    Reblogged from metanoiaboy

    Tags: oh the irony

    descentintotyranny:

FBI pressured Muslims into committing terrorist acts, then arrested them: report
July 21 2014
The FBI encouraged and sometimes even paid Muslims to commit terrorist acts during numerous sting operations after the 9/11 attacks, a human rights group said in a report published Monday.
“Far from protecting Americans, including American Muslims, from the threat of terrorism, the policies documented in this report have diverted law enforcement from pursuing real threats,” said the report by Human Rights Watch.
Aided by Columbia University Law School’s Human Rights Institute, Human Rights Watch examined 27 cases from investigation through trial, interviewing 215 people, including those charged or convicted in terrorism cases, their relatives, defense lawyers, prosecutors and judges.
“In some cases the FBI may have created terrorists out of law-abiding individuals by suggesting the idea of taking terrorist action or encouraging the target to act,” the report said.
In the cases reviewed, half the convictions resulted from a sting operation, and in 30 percent of those cases the undercover agent played an active role in the plot.
“Americans have been told that their government is keeping them safe by preventing and prosecuting terrorism inside the US,” said Andrea Prasow, the rights group’s deputy Washington director.
“But take a closer look and you realize that many of these people would never have committed a crime if not for law enforcement encouraging, pressuring and sometimes paying them to commit terrorist acts.”
US Attorney General Eric Holder has strongly defended the FBI undercover operations as “essential in fighting terrorism.”
“These operations are conducted with extraordinary care and precision, ensuring that law enforcement officials are accountable for the steps they take -– and that suspects are neither entrapped nor denied legal protections,” Holder said July 8 during a visit to Norway.
The HRW report, however, cites the case of four Muslim converts from Newburgh, New York who were accused of planning to blow up synagogues and attack a US military base.
A judge in that case “said the government ‘came up with the crime, provided the means, and removed all relevant obstacles,’ and had, in the process, made a terrorist out of a man ‘whose buffoonery is positively Shakespearean in scope,’” the report said.
The rights group charged that the FBI often targets vulnerable people, with mental problems or low intelligence.
It pointed to the case of Rezwan Ferdaus, who was sentenced to 17 years in prison at age 27 for wanting to attack the Pentagon and Congress with mini-drones loaded with explosives.
An FBI agent told Ferdaus’ father that his son “obviously” had mental health problems, the report said. But that didn’t stop an undercover agent from conceiving the plot in its entirety, it said.
“The US government should stop treating American Muslims as terrorists-in-waiting,” the report concluded.
Mike German, a former FBI agent now with the Brennan Center, said FBI counterterrorism excesses were a source of concern — “concerns that they both violate privacy and civil liberties, and aren’t effective in addressing real threats.”
But JM Berger, a national security expert, said law enforcement faces a dilemma: it can’t just ignore tips or reports about people talking about wanting to commit a terrorist action or seeking support for one.
“The question is how to sort out which cases merit investigation and which do not,” he said.

    descentintotyranny:

    FBI pressured Muslims into committing terrorist acts, then arrested them: report

    July 21 2014

    The FBI encouraged and sometimes even paid Muslims to commit terrorist acts during numerous sting operations after the 9/11 attacks, a human rights group said in a report published Monday.

    “Far from protecting Americans, including American Muslims, from the threat of terrorism, the policies documented in this report have diverted law enforcement from pursuing real threats,” said the report by Human Rights Watch.

    Aided by Columbia University Law School’s Human Rights Institute, Human Rights Watch examined 27 cases from investigation through trial, interviewing 215 people, including those charged or convicted in terrorism cases, their relatives, defense lawyers, prosecutors and judges.

    “In some cases the FBI may have created terrorists out of law-abiding individuals by suggesting the idea of taking terrorist action or encouraging the target to act,” the report said.

    In the cases reviewed, half the convictions resulted from a sting operation, and in 30 percent of those cases the undercover agent played an active role in the plot.

    “Americans have been told that their government is keeping them safe by preventing and prosecuting terrorism inside the US,” said Andrea Prasow, the rights group’s deputy Washington director.

    “But take a closer look and you realize that many of these people would never have committed a crime if not for law enforcement encouraging, pressuring and sometimes paying them to commit terrorist acts.”

    US Attorney General Eric Holder has strongly defended the FBI undercover operations as “essential in fighting terrorism.”

    “These operations are conducted with extraordinary care and precision, ensuring that law enforcement officials are accountable for the steps they take -– and that suspects are neither entrapped nor denied legal protections,” Holder said July 8 during a visit to Norway.

    The HRW report, however, cites the case of four Muslim converts from Newburgh, New York who were accused of planning to blow up synagogues and attack a US military base.

    A judge in that case “said the government ‘came up with the crime, provided the means, and removed all relevant obstacles,’ and had, in the process, made a terrorist out of a man ‘whose buffoonery is positively Shakespearean in scope,’” the report said.

    The rights group charged that the FBI often targets vulnerable people, with mental problems or low intelligence.

    It pointed to the case of Rezwan Ferdaus, who was sentenced to 17 years in prison at age 27 for wanting to attack the Pentagon and Congress with mini-drones loaded with explosives.

    An FBI agent told Ferdaus’ father that his son “obviously” had mental health problems, the report said. But that didn’t stop an undercover agent from conceiving the plot in its entirety, it said.

    “The US government should stop treating American Muslims as terrorists-in-waiting,” the report concluded.

    Mike German, a former FBI agent now with the Brennan Center, said FBI counterterrorism excesses were a source of concern — “concerns that they both violate privacy and civil liberties, and aren’t effective in addressing real threats.”

    But JM Berger, a national security expert, said law enforcement faces a dilemma: it can’t just ignore tips or reports about people talking about wanting to commit a terrorist action or seeking support for one.

    “The question is how to sort out which cases merit investigation and which do not,” he said.

     
  8. 14:20

    Notes: 488

    Reblogged from scienceyoucanlove

    Tags: fuck yeah science

    scienceyoucanlove:

“A team of researchers from Temple University of Medicine, US have made a significant breakthrough on the path towards a permanent cure for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) by designing a way to cut out integrated HIV-1 genes from human cells.”Further details:L#1: http://is.gd/yYjpxcL#2: http://is.gd/0oWb8mL#3: http://is.gd/GdqsZGImage via: Fine art America
through Hashem AL-ghaili

    scienceyoucanlove:

    “A team of researchers from Temple University of Medicine, US have made a significant breakthrough on the path towards a permanent cure for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) by designing a way to cut out integrated HIV-1 genes from human cells.”

    Further details:

    L#1: http://is.gd/yYjpxc
    L#2: http://is.gd/0oWb8m
    L#3: http://is.gd/GdqsZG

    Image via: Fine art America

    through Hashem AL-ghaili

     
  9. 14:09

    Notes: 218234

    Reblogged from koalateeblogger

    loltias:

    Seeing people the same age as you doing awesome things with their lifeimage

     
  10. 14:01

    Notes: 4499

    Reblogged from fishingboatproceeds

    fishingboatproceeds:

beingthebesttryingtobebetter:

fishingboatproceeds:

This thing looks like a huge thermos, and it is. By keeping rotavirus and pneumonia vaccines cold for 50 days, it saves kids’ lives. I saw it work perfectly in a rural health outpost with no running water or electricity, just an amazing health worker using technology suited to her needs.

There are coolers that keep sperm and eggs frozen for decades.

Yeah, but those coolers need electricity, something in very short supply in rural Ethiopia. (More than 60 million Ethiopians live outside or urban centers, and most of them—and most of the health centers that serve them—are without power or running water.) There are refrigerators that use propane or gas to keep cool, but propane can be expensive and difficult to keep in steady supply, so these ridiculously efficient Thermoses are (literally) a life-saver.
It’s difficult to overstate the poverty here: Most of the plowing of fields is done with wooden plows drawn by cattle, and there are almost no cars on the roads. (Most people travel by foot or on handmade carts drawn by animals). That Ethiopia has been able to reduce under-5 mortality from 25% to 8% in the past 20 years despite this poverty and a very rural population is a tremendous success story, and with effectively outfitted health posts, that percentage will get even lower—hopefully within the next decade Ethiopia’s child mortality rate will fall below the current world average of 5%.

    fishingboatproceeds:

    beingthebesttryingtobebetter:

    fishingboatproceeds:

    This thing looks like a huge thermos, and it is. By keeping rotavirus and pneumonia vaccines cold for 50 days, it saves kids’ lives. I saw it work perfectly in a rural health outpost with no running water or electricity, just an amazing health worker using technology suited to her needs.

    There are coolers that keep sperm and eggs frozen for decades.

    Yeah, but those coolers need electricity, something in very short supply in rural Ethiopia. (More than 60 million Ethiopians live outside or urban centers, and most of them—and most of the health centers that serve them—are without power or running water.) There are refrigerators that use propane or gas to keep cool, but propane can be expensive and difficult to keep in steady supply, so these ridiculously efficient Thermoses are (literally) a life-saver.

    It’s difficult to overstate the poverty here: Most of the plowing of fields is done with wooden plows drawn by cattle, and there are almost no cars on the roads. (Most people travel by foot or on handmade carts drawn by animals). That Ethiopia has been able to reduce under-5 mortality from 25% to 8% in the past 20 years despite this poverty and a very rural population is a tremendous success story, and with effectively outfitted health posts, that percentage will get even lower—hopefully within the next decade Ethiopia’s child mortality rate will fall below the current world average of 5%.